Home / News / Episode 26: Amy Berger, Author of The Alzheimer’s Antidote, on Nutrition and Brain Health

Episode 26: Amy Berger, Author of The Alzheimer’s Antidote, on Nutrition and Brain Health

 

Amy Berger struggled with health and physique despite doing all the ‘right’ things. She ended up discovering a low carb/ketogenic lifestyle and surprising enough to her, it helped her reach her goals! Not only did it work, but it made sense scientifically. Amy went back to school to get her Master’s in Human Nutrition from the University of Bridgeport. She is a Certified Nutrition Specialist and a certified Nutritional Therapy Practitioner. Amy operates ‘Tuit Nutrition,’ a nutrition counseling service for those looking to lose weight or make a change in their lives.

Amy’s background…2:30
- Nutrition is not Amy’s first career. She came to nutrition like many others; she struggled with weight loss and had tried many of the common methods. Amy stumbled across the 1992 version of the Atkins book and it all clicked. She discovered that this method of nutrition relieved her of many ailments and frustrations. She researches, studies, and lives out the low carb and ketogenic lifestyle.

What led you to get your Masters in Nutrition?…6:00
- Many people do not have a formal degree but are filled with knowledge. Amy feels her degree was the next step for her career; that it gives her an edge that not all have. Her other certifications and studies continue to grow her base of knowledge.

Military Service…8:55
- Amy joined the military after college because she felt like she needed a kick in the pants! She says she has a lot of ambition, but has getting it done. She thought being in military would instill that virtue in her. What she learned was that that drive and motivation, comes from within.

The Alzheimer’s Antidote…12:05
- The book Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taube influenced her interest in this topic. She decided to write her thesis on Alzheimer’s and began to study how glucose and insulin interact. The major problem in Alzheimer’s is that some neurons involved in memory loose the ability to process glucose -meaning they basically starve to death. Many of the patients have very high insulin levels. What she found was that ketone bodies can fuel the neurons even though they lost the ability to feed off of glucose. Because of the information she discovered, she decided to share it in the form of a book so others can learn about this relationship. Her book is now available!

Advice for someone concerned with their brain health…19:55
- Keep your blood glucose and insulin within a healthy range. Stay active and get good quality sleep!

Contact…
- www.tuitnutrition.com

 

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